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Skinetica, an acne revolutionary treatment or not? | Lip filler Chattanooga

 

Guys, I really need your opinion on this one so let me know what you think. Some weeks ago I received a product sample of a newly launched acne treatment, called Skinetica. It was included in the GlossyBox UK and it came with a flyer that boasted “no harsh chemicals”, “different than old fashioned traditional products”, “one application works for 12 hours” and “it gently moisturizes skin”. Big words for a small bottle, said the angel on my right shoulder. By any chance if you are looking for “Lip filler Chattanooga“, get in touch with “https://www.flawlesschattanooga.com” – they are the best in their business.

Being naturally curious I decided to give it a go, although I was a bit skeptical and with good reason, my eyes were already starting to spot “faults” in the little flyer I got, probably ethical left-overs from the time when I was doing the copywriting for the skincare company I used to work for.

Before talking about the product itself let me tell you why I disagree with Skinetica’s communication approach with their potential customers, and I will do that because I believe that we live in times when proper communication from a company to a client should be based on scientific ground and respect (for customers and for fellow  competitors):

UNAPPEALING WEBSITE (AT LEAST TO ME)

Skinetica is a one product brand and that can be difficult to market. Most of us like to see the diversity of a brand (it’s also evidence of social proof), to browse the products, see before and after pictures, different lines and most of the websites of skincare companies are quite “juicy” and interactive. Skinetica’s website might benefit from an up-to-date design and a more tamed message. But I’d love to hear your opinion on this, what do you think about Skinetica’s website?

INNOVATION, BUT WITH ALCOHOL

Skinetica is boasting about their product being “different than the traditional ones”, something that I would describe as an innovation, although they’re not using this word. They say that in 99% of the acne products (and by 99% meaning not an actual market percentage but a more catchy way of saying “almost all”) the active ingredients used are salicylic acid and benzoyl peroxide, which are described as “harsh chemicals”.

Well, I must say this is wrong because they are missing the third and most used acne ingredient on the market: alcohol. And if we turn around the bottle to see what is Skinetica formulated with … we’ll find alcohol.

There’s an entire controversy regarding alcohol  (I recommend an excellent article on Truth in Aging for more details), I will just say that alcohol in topical products is perfectly safe to use however, I would not say this product is different than the current ones on the market, I actually think it’s an involution for a product.

When companies are investing so much in exploring new ingredients, there is nothing special in launching an alcohol-based acne product, moreover promoting it as something different than current products, when in fact alcohol has been used in cosmetics before salycilic acid or benzoyl peroxide were introduced.

EMPLOYING NEGATIVE MARKETING STRATEGY

What struck me the most was the fact that the product is being promoted on the account of debatable negative effects of “salicylic acid” and “benzoyl peroxide”, categorized as harsh ingredients. Again, there’s another major dispute concerning this topic but disregarding other products (or other brands that use these ingredients) it is not really an ethical thing to do. In the end, there are a lot of dermatologically tested and good products formulated with salicylic acid and benzoyl peroxide that have a lot of research behind, and for some people, they work just fine.

Do you think this is a correct thing to do?

STATEMENTS THAT DON’T STAND

Another fact that got my attention was the following phrase “it gently moisturizes your skin” followed by my normal reaction, what is that ingredient (from the total of 4) that is responsible for the moisturizing effect according to the formulation: water, alcohol, fragrance or quaternary ammonium chloride? There isn’t any. In this case I would deem the phrase above a deception.

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